SNOWFLAKE TEST: A TOOL THAT MAKES A MARK

Various media outlets, TV shows, radio shows, and social media are covering it now. This has made it a hot topic these days. Millennials who are entitled to work and those who are prepared to do so often seem to be filtered out by employers and CEOs alike. Millennials are often described as snowflakes because they are entitled to their own way and get angry if they don’t get it. Besides an entitled attitude and unsubstantiated arguments, they are worthless.

Thus, if you’re ignorant, overly sensitive (a difficult term), sensitive to offense, possessive, and spoiled, then getting hired may be difficult. Providing their liberal attitudes do not interfere with their work, they are probably good to go. However, a lawsuit could be later filed by someone who is later offended.

Silent Partner Marketing CEO Jose Reyes says that a snowflake test is simply a personality test, and employers should be able to see who will work for them before they hire. So far, there is a mixed reaction to Snowflakes. On one hand, some people support the questions wholeheartedly, while on the other hand, others find them irrelevant.

It is in reality, immoral, and illegal to ask the questions.

The following are some of the main snowflake questions you can use to judge this type of test.

  1. What is the best time to increase the minimum wage?
  2. Is it appropriate for an employer to offer employees benefits beyond those already provided?
  3. “How often should a raise be given to an employee?”?
  4. Are there any aspects of guns that you like or dislike?
  5. How do you feel about clients or employees carrying guns?
  6. What was the last time you cried? Do you remember the last time you cried?
  7. Do you have a favorite adult beverage?
  8. As it relates to a future workforce, what do you think of the current college environment?
  9. What communication methods should we use with clients?
  10. What is your favorite thing to do in your free time?
  11. When someone bullies you, what do you do?
  12. What is your reason for believing in God?
  13. How would you describe the United States to someone?”?
  14. In your own words, explain what privilege means to you.
  15. When you have great ideas, how do you cope with rejection?
  16. Breakfast is one of the most important meals of the day.
  17. Would you disregard a colleague’s idea if it didn’t appeal to you?
  18. The first amendment is a fundamental right to freedom of speech. Do you understand its meaning?

There is a wide range of difficulty among the questions; some are easier to answer than others. Besides the questions you don’t know exactly how to respond to, such as “what’s your typical breakfast like?”, you may also be confused as to why you should answer, such as “How do you usually start your day?”. I wish all snowflakes seeking employment the best of luck!

You have accomplished your mission, Reyes! You’ve created a hiring policy to ensure equal opportunity at work. Orienting your company to hire sane candidates should not be based on implied views, but rather on the fact that such views shouldn’t be a requirement for employment.

It is because of Silent Partner’s relationship with so many police departments that the team must feel comfortable supporting the police. Of course, everyone supports the police. According to my assumption, Reyes conflates concerns about police practices with support for them.

Despite his claim, Reyes is wrong in asserting, “This is not a discriminatory test.” Because there is nothing glorified about the test.

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